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Mar 03
Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19): The Latest

CLICK HERE FOR COVID-19 VACCINE SITE INFORMATION IN THE CITY OF BOSTON

OVERVIEW:

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 or COVID-19 (formerly referred to as 2019 Novel Coronavirus or 2019-nCoV) is a new respiratory virus that was first identified in Wuhan, China in December of 2019. The City of Boston and BPHC have extended the public health emergency declaration until further notice

Boston's Latest Numbers (As of March 2, 2021): (Updated Monday-Friday)

  • 58,917 confirmed cases* 

  • 55,335 recovered

  • 1,274 deaths

*Due to an error at a laboratory, 98 Boston cases previously deemed positive have been reclassified as inconclusive.


Boston Race/Ethnicity Case Data: 

(Updated Monday-Friday)

Race/Ethnicity

Known Cases

Percentage of Known Cases

Asian/PI

3,092

6%

Black/African-American

12,907

24%

Latinx/Hispanic

16,191

30%

Other

3,500

7%

White

17,415

33%

Total Race/Ethnicity Identified Cases in Boston

53,105

90.1% of total cases in Boston have known Race/Ethnicity data

Total Cases in Boston 

58,917

 


Boston Race/Ethnicity Death Data: 

(Updated Monday-Friday)

Race/Ethnicity

Deaths

Percentage of Known Deaths

Asian/PI

98

8%

Black/African-American

413

32%

Latinx/Hispanic

158

12%

Other

42

3%

White

561

44%

Total Race/Ethnicity Identified Deaths in Boston

1,272

99.8% of total deaths in Boston have known Race/Ethnicity data

Total Deaths in Boston

1,274

 


Although complete data on race and ethnicity among COVID-19 positive cases in Boston residents has not been reported to the City of Boston, the Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC) is actively working to collect available data for public release.

NOTE: Information on race and ethnicity data is collected and reported by multiple entities and may or may not reflect self-reporting by the individual case. A classification of "missing" indicates that no reporter knew the race and ethnicity of the individual, the individual refused to provide the information, or that the originating reporting system does not capture the information. "Other" indicates multiple races or another race that is not listed above.

Click HERE for the latest COVID-19 Core Metrics: 03-02-2021

These are the core metrics critical to inform response leadership. BPHC and the City of Boston use this data to monitor the progress of the City's response, to guide decision making and to shape our response moving forward during the COVID-19 pandemic.   Click here for archived COVID-19 Metrics reports. The next update will be 03-06-2021.

All Boston Testing Data - Cumulative Community Positivity

The "Cumulative Community Positivity" calculation counts each individual person one time (their first negative, their first positive), regardless of the number of times an individual is tested, to assess the level of COVID-19 infection in the City and neighborhoods since the start of the pandemic. College ordered testing included. (As of February 25, 2021). The next update will be 03-06-2021.

NEIGHBORHOOD

​NUMBER TESTED

OF TESTED, CUMULATIVE % POSITIVE​

TESTING RATE PER 100,000 RESIDENTS​

East Boston - 02128

35,691

18.9%

76,056.4

Dorchester - 02122, 02124

47,983

​17.4%

59,326.2

Hyde Park - 02136

22,821

16.9%

66,683.2

Dorchester - 02121, 02125

43,885

16.4%

68,274.8

Mattapan - 02126

15,534

​15.3%

52,495.7

Roslindale - 02131

21,704

13.9%

64,268.2

South Boston - 02127, 02210

33,067

11.5%

82,473.7

West Roxbury - 02132

17,973

11.4%

63,091.9

Roxbury - 02119, 02120

40,280

11.2%

93,398.6

South End - 02111, 02118 

34,554

8.4%

96,638.3

C​harlestown - 02129 

13,557

8.0%

69,831.0

Jamaica Plain - 02130

33,413

7.6%​

82,752.6

Allston/Brighton - 02163, 02134, 02135 

57,446

7.3%​

86,274.7

Back Bay, Beacon Hill, West End, Downtown, & North End - 02108, 02114, 02116, 02199, 02222, 02109, 02110, 02113​

45,881

6.1%​

82,337.6

Fenway - 02115, 02215

76,907

3.3%​

140,528.4

Boston

​ 567,816

10.4%

83,574.5

*N/A = Unable to calculate due to small counts (N<5)

Neighborhood Testing Data - Current Community Positivity

The "Current Community Positivity" calculation counts each individual person one time within 7 days to better assess the current level of COVID-19 infection in the City and neighborhoods. Excludes college-ordered testing. (February 19-25). The next update will be 03-06-21.

NEIGHBORHOOD

​NUMBER TESTED

POSITIVE 
TESTS

% POSITIVE

Dorchester - 02122, 02124

2.243

131

5.8%

Dorchester - 02121, 02125

2,848

161

5.7%

Mattapan - 02126

1,007

53

5.3%

Roslindale - 02131

1,489

74

5.0%

Roxbury - 02119, 02120

1,508

70

4.6%

Hyde Park - 02136

1,629

63

3.9%

East Boston - 02128

1,847

68

3.7%

South Boston - 02127, 02210

2,280

79

3.5%

West Roxbury - 02132

1,311

42

3.2%

South End - 02111, 02118

1,867

49

2.6%

Fenway - 02115, 02215

1,046

23

2.2%

Jamaica Plain - 02130

2,288

44

1.9%

Back Bay, Beacon Hill, West End, Downtown, & North End - 02108, 02114, 02116, 02199, 02222, 02109, 02110, 02113

2,972

56

1.9%

Allston/Brighton - 02163, 02134, 02135

2,749

44

1.6%

Charlestown - 02129

1,047

14

1.3%

Boston

28,926

1,008

3.5%

*N/A = Unable to calculate due to small counts (N<5)


Click here for the BPHC 02-25-2021 Weekly COVID-19 Report

Number of deaths at long-term care facilities: 494 (Updated weekly: 03-01-2021)

ABOUT OUR RESPONSE:

Since January, BPHC and Boston EMS have taken extensive steps to prepare for a potential outbreak of COVID-19.

BPHC is engaging in daily communications with the CDC, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH), City of Boston departments and other community partners to make sure we have the latest information on guidance, best practices and recommendations. BPHC will provide updated information on this website and on our social media channels as it becomes available.

We are confident the City of Boston continues to be ready for a safe and effective response as the situation develops.

HAVE QUESTIONS ABOUT COVID-19?

Visit the BPHC Main COVID-19 Page

Call 311 or 211

Call the Mayor's Healthline: 

617-534-5050 or Toll-Free: 1-800-847-0710

Feb 26
Mayor Walsh Announces The City of Boston Will Enter Modified Version of Phase 3, Step 2 of the Commonwealth's Reopening Plan on Monday

​Friday, February 26, 2021 - Mayor Martin J. Walsh, Chief of Health and Human Services Marty Martinez, and the City of Boston today announced, effective Monday, March 1, Boston will move with the Commonwealth into Phase 3, Step 2 of the state's reopening plan, with the following exceptions:

  • Indoor performance venues and indoor recreational activities with greater potential for contact will remain closed until March 22.

  • In Boston, the City will not allow live musical performances in restaurants until March 22. 



"Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, Boston has taken a cautious approach to reopening," said Mayor Walsh. "We've prioritized the health and safety of our residents, and we've made decisions based on the latest public health data and metrics. We've only moved forward when it's safe. Throughout the pandemic, the City of Boston has made decisions that protect our public health, while recognizing the economic impact of this public health emergency. I want to thank our residents and businesses for their continued cooperation throughout the reopening process."

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts will move to Step 2 of Phase 3 of the state's reopening plan on Monday, March 1:

  • Indoor performance venues (such as concert halls, theaters, and other indoor performance spaces) can open at 50% capacity, with a 500-person max. (*Please note: This does not apply in Boston until March 22.)

  • Indoor recreational activities with greater potential for contact (laser tag, roller skating, trampolines, obstacle courses) will open at 50% capacity. (*Please note: This does not apply in Boston until March 22.)

  • A number of industries will increase to 50% capacity.

  • Restaurants will no longer be subject to a seated capacity limit. However, there must be six feet between tables. No more than 6 people per table will be allowed, and the 90-minute time limit on tables stays in place. (*Please note: In Boston, the City will not allow live musical performances in restaurants until March 22.)

  • Food courts remain closed.

The state also announced its plan to transition to Step 1 of Phase 4 on Monday, March 22, provided public health metrics continue to improve. The City of Boston will continue evaluating public health and data leading up to this date to determine next steps in Boston's reopening plan. If public health data supports continued reopening, the City of Boston is prepared to align with the Commonwealth's plan to move into Step 1 of Phase 4 on Monday, March 22. Additional information is available on the Commonwealth's website

Additional information about reopening in Boston
is available on boston.gov

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Feb 20
City of Boston, Massachusetts Association For The Blind And Visually Impaired Hold COVID-19 Vaccination Appointments Designated For Seniors With Vision Loss

Saturday, February 20, 2021 – Today the City of Boston partnered with the Massachusetts Association for the Blind, Visually Impaired (MABVI) to arrange for older adults with vision loss to receive the COVID-19 vaccine at the Reggie Lewis Track and Athletic Center in Roxbury. Fourteen individuals were vaccinated this afternoon through the coordinated effort by MABVI, the Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC), City of Boston’s Age Strong Commission and the Commission for Persons with Disabilities. 

Boston is working with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to vaccinate residents against COVID-19. Following the State's lead, the City is working to create equitable access to the COVID-19 vaccine across all populations and neighborhoods in the city.

“We need to break down barriers that may prevent some individuals from getting vaccinated. I’m grateful for the partnership with MABVI to make today’s appointments happen as we work to ensure that all Bostonians have access to the vaccine when they’re eligible,” said Chief of Health and Human Services, Marty Martinez.

After targeted outreach to schedule appointments, individuals were greeted at the door of the Reggie Lewis Center and guided by a trained volunteer who provided language and accessibility support through the entire vaccination process. In advance of today’s vaccination session, MABVI provided training for clinic staff to create a safe, welcoming space for everyone.

“We are very grateful to the City for their commitment to ensuring access to the site. Breaking down the transportation barrier for our participants who have faced challenges finding rides and guides to assist them is critical, especially during this time of social isolation and distancing,” said Kyle Robidoux, Director of Volunteer Services & Community Planning for MABVI.

"Mayor Walsh's priority is to ensure that all eligible residents with disabilities have access to the vaccine," said Boston Disability Commissioner Kristen McCosh. "Partnering with trusted disability agencies such as MABVI is crucial to this effort."

Under state guidance, vaccines are now available to adults 65+ and individuals with two or more certain medical conditions. For more information on when and where you will be eligible to receive the vaccine, visit Mass.gov/COVIDvaccine. To find a vaccination site in the City of Boston, visit boston.gov/COVID19vaccine. Individuals aged 65 and older who do not have internet access, or who are having trouble navigating the site, are encouraged to call 3-1-1 to get connected to the City's Age Strong Commission. They can help answer questions and navigate the options available. Residents outside of Boston can call 2-1-1, the Mass Vaccine Scheduling Resource line. Translators are available to assist.

About the Massachusetts Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired:

Founded in 1903, Massachusetts Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired is one of the oldest social service organizations in the country supporting adults and seniors who are blind or low vision. A division of MAB Community Services, Inc., MABVI is a leading provider of integrated medical, social, and rehabilitation services for adults and seniors with vision loss. MABVI empowers individuals and offers them the tools they need to accomplish their goals by helping to remove barriers and increasing access to services. MABVI partners with numerous medical, elder services, and community agencies to create high-impact, cost-effective services for over 1500 for blind and low vision people across the Commonwealth.

About the Boston Public Health Commission:

The Boston Public Health Commission, one of the country's oldest health departments, is an independent public agency providing a wide range of health services and programs. It is governed by a seven-member board of health appointed by the Mayor of Boston. Public service and access to quality health care are the cornerstones of our mission - to protect, preserve and promote the health and well-being of all Boston residents, particularly those who are most vulnerable. The Commission's more than 40 programs are grouped into six bureaus: Emergency Medical Services; Child Adolescent & Family Health; Community Health Initiatives; Homeless Services; Infectious Disease; and Recovery Services.

About the Age Strong Commission:

The Age Strong Commission works towards making Boston a city that fully embraces aging. Our mission is to enhance the lives of people 55+ with meaningful programs, resources, and connections so we can live and age strong together in Boston. For more than 50 years, we have served constituents as a City department, Council on Aging, and Area Agency on Aging. In 2017, the Commission launched its Age-Friendly Action Plan, which is the City's blueprint to make Boston the best city to live and age in.

About the City of Boston Commission for Persons with Disabilities: 

The Commission for Persons with Disabilities facilitates full and equal participation in all aspects of life by persons with disabilities in the City of Boston. The Commission strives to reduce architectural, procedural, attitudinal, and communication barriers that affect persons with disabilities. The Commission coordinates and monitors the City’s compliance with federal, state, and city civil rights laws for persons with disabilities.

###

Feb 12
Mayor Walsh Announces New Scholarships to Help Add Diverse Paramedics to Boston EMS

Friday, February 12, 2021 - Building on a commitment to promote diversity and inclusion among the ranks of Boston Emergency Medical Services (EMS), Mayor Martin J. Walsh and Boston EMS Chief James Hooley today announced new paramedic certification scholarships for current EMS members. Coordinated through the United Coalition of EMS Providers (UCEP), a Boston EMS affinity group dedicated to advancing equity, inclusion and diversity at all ranks, and in partnership with both the Mayor's Office of Workforce Development (OWD) and Bunker Hill Community College (BHCC), 16 emergency medical technicians are now beginning their coursework at Bunker Hill Community College to become certified paramedics. This program is designed to expand the diversity of Boston EMS members holding a paramedic certification. 

"Boston is a diverse city, and it's crucial that our public safety services in Boston, including our paramedics, reflect our neighborhoods, and our values," said Mayor Walsh. "I'm proud that with this scholarship, we will continue to support diversity at Boston EMS, and care for all those who call Boston home."

Boston EMS paramedics staff five frontline ambulances, providing advanced life-saving care during medical emergencies across the city. Paramedics are state-certified EMTs who hold an additional certification, expanding their scope of practice to include complex procedures, such as intubations and starting an IV. Boston EMS members promoted to the rank of paramedic earn approximately 36 percent more than an EMT.  

"I am very proud of what UCEP was able to accomplish in just five short months, securing Mayoral support and funding, as well as coordinating directly with Bunker Hill Community College; increasing the diversity of our paramedics will result in a direct benefit inpatient care," said Boston EMS Chief of Department, Jim Hooley.     

The professional development and advancement of Boston EMS members have been ongoing department priorities. Boston EMS has worked with multiple paramedic training programs and colleges to reduce barriers for all interested personnel to advance their education.  

Boston EMS has maintained a longstanding commitment to hiring candidates that reflect the racial, ethnic and linguistic diversity of Boston's neighborhoods. While 40 percent of personnel hired in the last three years are women and 36 percent identify as Asian, Black or African American, Latinx or more than two races, personnel holding the rank of paramedic just are 6 percent persons of color and 19 percent women. The paramedic certification, which can cost over $10,000 to secure, can be cost-prohibitive for members, making it difficult to build diversity at this
rank. 

"The Boston EMS members selected for the paramedic UCEP scholarship are 75 percent women (12 of 16), 37 percent bilingual (6), and 94 percent (15) people of color. Eligibility for selection included UCEP membership, open to all members of Boston EMS, and a commitment to promoting equity and inclusion," said Deputy Lee Alexander, who leads Diversity, Recruitment and Engagement for the department and is a board member of United Coalition of EMS Providers.  

In the wake of George Floyd's murder and the events of 2020, members of Boston EMS hosted a listening session for personnel to talk about their own experiences with racial discrimination in the spring of 2020. 

"United Coalition of EMS Providers was formed from these listening sessions, dedicated to promoting diversity and inclusion within the City of Boston's municipal ambulance service," said EMT Roger Hamlet, President and Founder of United Coalition of EMS Providers. 

Under Mayor Walsh's leadership, the Office of Workforce Development (OWD) worked closely with UCEP and successfully secured grant funding through Neighborhood Jobs Trust for financially eligible personnel. UCEP secured an additional $20,000 contribution from SkillWorks, a nationally recognized workforce development funders' collaborative co-lead by the Boston Foundation and the City of Boston's Office of Workforce Development. 

"This is exactly the kind of workforce equity project SkillWorks exists to support. Not only will the Paramedics benefit from a good job at a good wage, the entire community benefits from a Paramedic team that understands the true diversity of cultures here in Boston," said Andre Green, Executive Director of SkillWorks.  

This work with OWD is an expansion of their ongoing partnership with Boston EMS to help city residents secure necessary training to meet the EMT hiring prerequisites through their EMT City Academy program. 

"We are fully committed to the equitable access of education and training for all Boston residents," said Trinh Nguyen, Director of OWD. "It's not only a priority value of this city, but it is an amazing investment for our business and economy."   

ABOUT BOSTON EMS 

Boston EMS is the primary provider of emergency medical services for the City of Boston and is a nationally recognized leader in the field of pre-hospital emergency medicine. The department leverages the latest advances in both medicine and technology to bring high-quality, compassionate care to the people of Boston. Boston EMS also plays a key role in the City's emergency preparedness efforts and provides community programming designed to educate the public about important health and safety topics.

###


Feb 05
Mayor Walsh, Boston Health Officials to Increase Capacity Limit on Businesses Starting Monday

Friday, February 5, 2021 - Given the improvement in the number of COVID-19 cases and the City's positivity rate over the past few weeks, today Mayor Martin J. Walsh announced that beginning on Monday, February 8, the City of Boston will align with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts' reopening guidance by lifting the 25% capacity restrictions on local businesses, including restaurants and gyms. Effective Monday, February 8 at 5:00 a.m., businesses can operate at 40% capacity, an increase from the current 25% capacity limit.

"Since the start of the pandemic, we've made decisions based on science and data. The data right now tells us things are moving in the right direction," said Mayor Walsh. "While Massachusetts continues to expand access to vaccines and our numbers trend modestly downward, we need to stay vigilant. Please keep wearing face coverings, washing your hands, staying 6 feet apart and please do not gather with people you don't live with."

As of January 28, 2021, the City was averaging 342.7 COVID-19 positive cases per day, down from 590.4 in mid-January. The City's positive rate is currently 6.2 percent, down from a high of 8.9 percent in early January. For more on COVID-19 cases per neighborhood, visit here.  

The following industries in the City of Boston may increase to 40% capacity on February 8, 2021: 

  • Arcades and Recreational Businesses

  • Close Contact Personal Services (employees do not count toward the 40% limit)

  • Driving and Flight Schools

  • Golf (indoor areas)

  • Gyms/Health Clubs

  • Libraries (Boston Public Libraries will not be open for browsing, but services will remain available through the BPL To Go program)

  • Lodging (common areas)

  • Movie theaters (maximum of 50 people per theater)

  • Museums

  • Offices

  • Places of Worship 

  • Restaurants (employees do not count toward the 40% limit)

  • Retail 

The City remains in Step One of Phase Three of the Reopening Massachusetts Plan. Current restrictions on gathering sizes remains the same, limiting gathering sizes to 10 people indoors and 25 people outdoors. The gatherings limit applies to private homes, event venues and public spaces. These restrictions are intended to reduce the spread of the COVID-19 virus during the public health emergency. The Inspectional Services Department (ISD) continues to coordinate the City's enforcement of these restrictions in collaboration with the Boston Police Department, the Boston Fire Department, and the Boston Public Health Commission. These departments work together to investigate and address reported COVID-19 related issues and complaints. In 2020, city agencies responded to and resolved approximately 2,500 complaints. BPD has a party line (617-343-5500) set up to flag properties to investigate. Additionally, the Licensing Board has instituted a weekly standing emergency hearing on Mondays to address any violations of these requirements over the preceding weekend. These hearings allow the Licensing Board to swiftly address these violations as they are a public health and safety concern. 

COVID-19 Vaccination and Testing Efforts

The City is working with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to vaccinate residents against COVID-19. This week vaccination sites opened at Fenway Park, the East Boston Neighborhood Health Center and at the Reggie Lewis Track and Athletic Center at Roxbury Community College to anyone who is eligible under the State's vaccine distribution timeline. Following the State's lead, the Boston Public Health Commission in partnership with the Mayor's Office of Health and Human Services is working to create equitable access to the COVID-19 vaccine across all populations and neighborhoods in the city. For more information on when and where you will be eligible to receive the vaccine, visit Mass.gov/COVIDvaccine. Individuals aged 75 and older who do not have internet access, or who are having trouble navigating the site, are encouraged to call 3-1-1 to get connected to the City's Age Strong Commission. They can help answer questions and navigate the options available. The State has also announced a new 2-1-1 Mass Vaccine Scheduling Resource line. Translators are available to assist.

"As we ramp up efforts to vaccinate eligible residents, we cannot lose focus on the proven ways to slow the spread of COVID-19. Wear a mask, wash your hands, practice social distancing and get tested. There are more than 30 testing sites open across the City that make COVID-19 testing quick and easy," said Chief of Health and Human Services, Marty Martinez.

The City of Boston is partnering with community health centers to increase access to testing, particularly in neighborhoods experiencing higher rates of COVID-19. More information about COVID-19 testing sites throughout the city can be found here. The City is also offering mobile testing sites that are available to anyone, regardless of symptoms and insurance coverage. The mobile testing sites are located in Upham's Corner, Grove Hall, Jamaica Plain and Hyde Park for the month of February.

For more information about Boston's reopening, please visit boston.gov/reopening. For additional questions, please visit the City's coronavirus website or call 3-1-1, Boston's 24-hour constituent hotline. Text BOSCOVID to 888-777 to receive text alerts on a regular basis, available in 11 languages.

###

Feb 01
Boston EMS Celebrate New EMT Graduates

Monday, February 1, 2021 – Today Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh and Boston Emergency Medical Services Chief James Hooley celebrated the graduation of 14 Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) recruits in a small virtual ceremony. This graduating class will be assigned to 911 ambulances, strengthening the City of Boston's Emergency Medical Services (EMS).


“During this unprecedented crisis, our EMTs and paramedic have been working selflessly on the frontlines every day to help lead the City’s response and save lives,” said Mayor Walsh, who participated in today’s ceremony with a recorded video message for the graduates. “They’ve done so with passion and dedication, and today’s recruits are ready to join the efforts as we continue to battle COVID-19. I want to thank this class for their service and congratulate them as they join the best EMS department in the country.” 

This academy class has been on the frontlines of the City’s COVID-19 response efforts during the pandemic. Boston EMS EMTs and paramedics have provided care to more than 4,300 patients with confirmed cases of COVID-19. 167 of those patients were treated by this class of EMS recruits. Today marks the second EMS graduation since the pandemic began last year.

“This recruit class has courageously cared for Boston residents during some of the most difficult months of the pandemic. They’ve seen firsthand that putting on this uniform every day is not a job; it is a calling that takes precision and compassion. I am proud to be here today to officially welcome these men and women into our Boston EMS family. I know they’ll serve this city well,” said Boston EMS Chief James Hooley.  

Today's ceremony formally acknowledges the 14 recruits’ (11 men, 3 women) successful completion of a rigorous post-hire training program for EMTs at Boston EMS. Already state certified EMTs prior to their hire, this graduating class completed an additional six months of classroom and field training while complying with COVID-19 safety protocols. In total during three months of field training in ambulances, these recruits responded to 2,298 emergency incidents including strokes, stabbings, traumatic injuries, seizures, carbon monoxide illness, overdoses and more. With guidance from seasoned EMT field training officers, recruits are not only prepared to care for patients, regardless of the circumstances, they also now understand the level of care, clinical excellence and professionalism expected of Boston EMS EMTs.


Boston EMS is one of the busiest municipal EMS providers in New England, responding to more than 125,000 emergency medical incidents per year. As a bureau of the Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC), Boston EMS is committed to serving Boston's residents through clinical excellence, emergency planning and preparedness, and community outreach.

In his FY20 budget, Mayor Walsh added four EMTs to promote diversity and recruitment as well as resources to expand the capacity of Boston EMS's Community Assistance Team, also known as Squad 80. Squad 80 is a two-person team that travels in a non-transport vehicle and answers calls where patients have a low frequency of being transported to the emergency room, making more ambulances available for priority calls that need to get patients to the hospital. It also connects people to our recovery and homeless support services and other city programs. In FY21, Mayor Walsh and the City of Boston are investing in seven new ambulances, as well as new portable radios to support coordination and communication, new body armor to protect EMTs and Paramedics and new automated external defibrillators (AEDs) for patient care. 


###

ABOUT BOSTON EMS

Boston EMS is the primary provider of emergency medical services for the City of Boston and is a nationally recognized leader in the field of pre-hospital emergency medicine. The department leverages the latest advances in both medicine and technology to bring high-quality, compassionate care to the people of Boston. Boston EMS also plays a key role in the City's emergency preparedness efforts and provides community programming designed to educate the public about important health and safety topics.

ABOUT THE BOSTON PUBLIC HEALTH COMMISSION

The Boston Public Health Commission, one of the country's oldest health departments, is an independent public agency providing a wide range of health services and programs. It is governed by a seven-member board of health appointed by the Mayor of Boston. Public service and access to quality health care are the cornerstones of our mission - to protect, preserve and promote the health and well-being of all Boston residents, particularly those who are most vulnerable. The Commission's more than 40 programs are grouped into six bureaus: Emergency Medical Services; Child Adolescent & Family Health; Community Health Initiatives; Homeless Services; Infectious Disease; and Recovery Services.



Jan 31
Mayor Walsh Declares Snow Emergency, Parking Ban in Effect Monday at Noon

Sunday, January 31, 2021 - Mayor Martin J. Walsh today declared a snow emergency ahead of the forecasted winter storm that is scheduled to begin tomorrow morning and end Tuesday afternoon. Total snow accumulations are expected to range between 8 to 12 inches, and winds as high as 45 mph are expected. Residents are advised that a parking ban will take effect starting at noon tomorrow, when vehicles parked on major roads and main arteries will start to be towed. The City is urging residents to abide by snow regulations and encouraging all commuters to use caution when traveling during the Monday evening and Tuesday morning commutes. Dry weather, paired with colder temperatures and wind chill, are anticipated on Wednesday and Thursday following the storm.

"I am urging everyone to be ready and prepared for tomorrow's forecasted snowstorm," said Mayor Walsh. "All of our residents and workers should take precautions on our roads and sidewalks, particularly during the Monday evening and Tuesday morning commutes. Our Public Works Department will be working around the clock to pre-treat and clean our roads, and I thank them for their hard work. We are asking residents and businesses to do their part by staying safe, shoveling their sidewalks and walkways, clearing catch basins and the area around fire hydrants, and by offering help to your older neighbors and residents with disabilities. The City of Boston will continue to share updates throughout the storm."

  • A snow emergency has been declared, starting Monday, February 1, 2021 at noon. A parking ban will also take effect at noon tomorrow. All vehicles parked on a posted snow emergency artery will be towed beginning at noon on Monday. Residents can find a list of free and discounted garages here; and parking at participating garages will begin at 10 a.m. on Monday. 

  • Trash and recycling pick-up will continue on a regular schedule on Monday, February 1st and Tuesday, February 2nd. Residents are encouraged to download the Trash Day App for more information on their trash and recycling pick-up schedule. 

  • Nighttime street sweeping on main roads, arterials, and commercial roads is canceled until further notice. Updates will be provided on boston.gov when nighttime street sweeping is scheduled to resume.

  • All Boston Public Schools (BPS) students, including students who were scheduled to report for in-person learning, will attend classes online on both Monday and Tuesday for a partial day that will end 2.5 hours earlier than the regularly scheduled dismissal time. There will be no in-person learning on Monday and Tuesday, and all BPS buildings will be closed on those days. 

  • In-person learning will resume on Thursday, February 4, 2021.

  • As indicated in signage posted in BPS school parking lots, parking is not allowed in these lots during snowstorms. Vehicles may be towed if they are parked in BPS parking lots during the snow emergency.

  • BPS meal distribution sites will be open on Monday, February 1 from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. All Boston Centers for Youth and Families (BYCF) meal sites will be closed on Monday. Residents are encouraged to check with their non-BPS meal sites for hours. 

  • The City-sponsored mobile COVID-19 testing site at the Anna M. Cole Community Center in Jamaica Plain will be closed on Monday. For other updates on testing site availability and closures, please check hours of operation here

  • Due to the snowstorm, the vaccine clinic originally planned for Monday, February 1, at the Reggie Lewis Track and Athletic Center at Roxbury Community College will now be moved to next Monday, February 8. All appointments scheduled for February 1 have been automatically rescheduled for February 8. 

Boston City Hall will be open to the public on Monday, February 1st only for residents who need to pay their property taxes or file an abatement application by the February 1st deadline. Boston City Hall and all City departments will be open to the public on Tuesday, February 2nd. We encourage residents to utilize our online services when possible. Boston Public Library locations will be closed on Monday, including in-person BPL To Go services. All BCYF community centers will be closed, remote programming will continue and registered lap swim sessions will be cancelled from 12 p.m. on.

The Public Works Department (PWD) will have equipment to pre-treat Boston's roads prior to the snowfall starting, and the City has the ability to put over 700 pieces of equipment on city streets. The PWD currently has 42,000 tons of salt on hand.

The Office of Emergency Management (OEM) is in constant contact with the National Weather Service to receive detailed forecast updates for the City of Boston and to ensure City departments have plans in place to handle the weather. Residents can sign up to receive AlertBoston notifications by phone, text, or email. Residents can call 311 for non-emergency issues.

 

Rules on clearing snow:

  • Property owners must fully clear snow, sleet and ice from sidewalks and curb ramps abutting the property within three hours after the snowfall ends, or three hours after sunrise if the snow ends overnight. Curb and pedestrian ramps to the street should be cleared fully and continually over the duration of the storm to ensure accessibility for individuals with disabilities. If the storm lasts for an extended period of time, property owners are asked to continually check and clear ramps abutting their property. 

  • Removal of snow and ice from a private property to the street or sidewalk is prohibited. 

  • Failure to comply with these rules can result in fines issued by PWD's Code Enforcement Division. Fines associated with improper removal of snow can be found here.

Caring for vulnerable populations:

  • If you see homeless or vulnerable individuals out in the cold who appear immobile, disoriented or underdressed for the weather, please call 911.

  • The Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC) coordinates a city-wide network of emergency shelters, outreach providers, city agencies and first responders to assist those in need of shelter.

  • Boston's emergency shelters are open 24-hours a day and will accept any person in need. Men can access shelter at the  112 Southampton Street Shelter, and women should go to the Woods-Mullen Shelter at 794 Massachusetts Ave. BPHC and the City work closely with shelter providers to ensure that no client is without shelter, food, resources, and a warm respite from the cold.

  • The City has over 200 beds for the winter spread throughout sites in Brighton, Mission Hill and downtown. Additionally, the City worked with the Commonwealth to add additional shelter capacity in locations surrounding and outside of Boston.

  • The BPHC Engagement Center is open from 6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. In addition to providing an indoor heated space, it offers a range of basic amenities and comfort items, such as clean bathroom facilities, water, coffee, and light snacks.

  • During extreme cold weather, street outreach teams operate with extended hours and provide mobile outreach vans on the streets in the evening and throughout the day.

Safety tips:

  • Keep catch basins and fire hydrants clear. For a map of catch basins and fire hydrants, visit here. You can assist in keeping hydrants clear of snow so the Boston Fire Department can access them quickly in case of emergency.

  • Shoveling snow requires significant exertion; please be cautious and pay attention to signs of overexertion. Stop if you feel chest pain, shortness of breath, lightheaded, nausea, or vomiting. Call 911 if those symptoms do not resolve quickly.

  • Snow piles can make navigating intersections dangerous for pedestrians and drivers. Please take extra care when turning corners with snow piles that might limit visibility.

  • Carbon monoxide poisoning is a concern during winter weather, especially with the use of generators. Residents should use their home heating systems wisely and safely, and have a working carbon monoxide detector on each floor of the home. Call 911 immediately if you suspect carbon monoxide poisoning.

  • Sitting in a car while idling can be deadly if the tailpipe is blocked. Do not let children sit in an idling car while shoveling. Clear any household exhaust pipes (e.g. gas exhaust for heating systems or dryers) and vehicle exhaust pipes of snow.

  • Have a contractor check the roof to see if snow needs to be removed. If roof snow can be removed from the ground with the use of a snow-rake, do so with caution. Avoid working from ladders, and be mindful of slippery surfaces. 

Dress for the weather:

  • Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, residents are required to wear face masks or cloth face coverings in all public places, whether indoors or outdoors, even where they are able to maintain 6 feet of distance from others. 

  • Wear several layers of loose-fitting, lightweight, warm clothing rather than one layer of heavy clothing.

  • Outer garments should be tightly woven and water repellent.

  • Wear mittens over gloves; layering works for your hands as well.

  • Always wear a hat, and cover your mouth with a scarf to protect your lungs.  

  • Dress children warmly, and set reasonable time limits on outdoor play.

  • Restrict infants' outdoor exposure when it is colder than 40 degrees Fahrenheit.

Watch for signs of frostbite:

  • Signs of frostbite include loss of feeling and white or pale appearance in extremities such as fingers, toes, ear lobes, and the tip of the nose. If symptoms are detected, get medical help immediately.

Watch for signs of hypothermia:

  • These include uncontrollable shivering, memory loss, disorientation, incoherence, slurred speech, drowsiness and apparent exhaustion. If you or someone you know shows any of these symptoms, get in touch with a healthcare provider immediately. If symptoms are severe, call 911.

Heating safety:

  • Never try to heat your home using a charcoal or gas grill, the kitchen stove, or other product not specifically designed as a heater. These can cause a fire or produce dangerous levels of carbon monoxide very quickly. 

  • Have your heating system cleaned and checked annually.

  • Install and maintain smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors on every level of your home. Carbon monoxide is an invisible gas produced whenever any fuel is burned. Common sources include oil or gas furnaces, water heaters, fireplaces, stoves, and some space heaters. It has no smell, taste, or color, and it is poisonous and potentially deadly.

Emergency home repair resources: 

  • Income-eligible homeowners and Boston's residents over age 60 can receive assistance with winter emergencies and repairs, such as fixing storm damage, leaking roofs, furnaces and leaking/frozen pipes. For assistance, residents should call the Mayor's hotline at 311 or the Boston Home Center at 617-635-HOME (4663).   

  • In addition, the Mayor's Seniors Save program helps income eligible Bostonians over the age of 60 replace old, inefficient heating systems with a brand new heating system before a catastrophic failure occurs during the cold winter months. Older adults can also call 311 or the Boston Home Center at 617-635-HOME (4663) to be connected with a City staffer to provide additional details.   

For more information, please visit the Winter in Boston guide and follow @CityofBoston on Twitter.

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Jan 29
Mayor Walsh Issues Safety Guidelines For Residents as Coldest Weather of the Season Arrives

Friday, January 29, 2021 - Mayor Martin J. Walsh today shared a set of tips and guidelines for residents to manage this weekend's bitterly cold weather. Boston is experiencing sub-zero wind chill temperatures through Sunday, January 31. This weekend's temperatures meet the thresholds for activating the use of warming centers in the city in accordance with COVID-19 guidelines. 

"We want to ensure that every Boston resident stays warm and safe with the bitter cold weather this weekend," said Mayor Walsh. "It is essential that we support and look out for each other, while also making sure we are observing COVID-19 public health guidelines. Please continue to wear a face covering, practice social distancing, wash your hands often, and avoid crowds as we brave these cold temperatures. I urge Bostonians to call 911 if they see someone in distress, as we are here to help and make sure people are safe."

Wind chill values today are predicted to be as low as -8 degrees Fahrenheit, expected to be as low as -7 degrees Fahrenheit on Saturday, before rising to above freezing temperatures. The City is also tracking and monitoring a possible winter storm that's expected to arrive late Monday into early Tuesday, and preparations are being made to support the needs of Boston residents.

Warming centers are open today from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. and tomorrow from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Due to COVID-19 public health regulations, all warming center visitors will be screened for symptoms before entry, must wear a face covering (covering both the nose and mouth), maintain 6 feet of distance from others, and wash their hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Visitors must bring their own water bottles, and must limit belongings to one small bag. Occupancy will be monitored to ensure it doesn't exceed 25 percent of the building's maximum permitted occupancy to maintain proper distancing. The spaces will be cleaned and disinfected hourly. The locations of the warming centers include:

  • Allston/Brighton: BCYF Jackson-Mann Community Center, 500 Cambridge St., Allston

  • Charlestown: BCYF Charlestown Community Center, 255 Medford St., Charlestown 

  • Dorchester: BCYF Holland Community Center, 85 Olney St., Dorchester

  • East Boston: BCYF Paris Street Community Center, 112 Paris St., East Boston

  • Hyde Park: BCYF Hyde Park Community Center, 1179 River St., Hyde Park

  • Jamaica Plain: BCYF Curtis Hall Community Center, 20 South St., Jamaica Plain 

  • Mattapan: BCYF Mildred Avenue Community Center, 5 Mildred Ave., Mattapan 

  • North End: BCYF Nazzaro Community Center, 30 N. Bennet St., Boston

  • Roslindale: BCYF Menino Community Center, 125 Brookway Rd., Roslindale 

  • Roxbury: BCYF Tobin Community Center,1481 Tremont St., Boston

  • South Boston: BCYF Condon Community Center, 200 D St., S. Boston

  • South End: BCYF Blackstone Community Center, 50 West Brookline Street, Boston

  • West Roxbury: BCYF Roche Community Center,1716 Centre St., West Roxbury

Mayor Walsh advised residents to take precautions as the weather persists throughout the weekend, reminding them especially to check in on older adults, people with disabilities and people experiencing homelessness. If you see homeless and vulnerable individuals out in the cold who appear immobile, disoriented or underdressed for the cold, please call 911. If residents are aware of anyone staying in a vehicle or a place not intended for living during these extreme cold temperatures, they are encouraged to call 911 as well.

The Mayor encouraged all persons in shelters, auxiliary sites and families with young children to stay indoors and avoid the extremely cold weather. Additionally, the Mayor announced other precautions the city is putting in place to protect residents from the cold weather:

  • Three mobile outreach vehicles on the street in the daytime at the Pine Street Inn. Further outreach will be provided by other agencies downtown and in the Back Bay.

  • A van provided by The City of Boston Office of Recovery Services to help persons in need access the  Engagement Center, the PAATHS Program and Emergency Shelters from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

  • The 24/7 opening of all adult emergency shelters and winter overflow sites began Thursday night and will extend through the weekend. The Boston Police Department (BPD) is making announcements on every shift for officers and all personnel to be on the lookout for vulnerable people on the streets. BPD will conduct wellness checks or assist with transportation to available shelters and coordinate with emergency medical personnel for unsheltered homeless persons in distress. 

  • The BPD Street Outreach Unit will be available as a resource to assist the districts, outreach providers and 911 dispatch as needed.  

  • The MBTA will similarly make announcements on every shift for MBTA Police officers and transportation personnel to be on the lookout for vulnerable people. The agency will have extra officers on duty who will make vehicles available to provide transportation to shelter or to contact emergency medical personnel for unsheltered homeless persons in distress.

Key safety tips include:

Dress for the weather:

  • Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, residents are required to wear face masks or cloth face coverings in all public places, whether indoors or outdoors, even when they are able to maintain 6 feet of distance from others. 

  • Wear several layers of loose-fitting, lightweight, warm clothing rather than one layer of heavy clothing.

  • Outer garments should be tightly woven and water repellent.

  • Wear mittens over gloves; layering works for your hands as well.

  • Always wear a hat and cover your mouth with a scarf to protect your lungs.  

  • Dress children warmly and set reasonable time limits on outdoor play.

  • Restrict infants' outdoor exposure when it is colder than 40 degrees Fahrenheit.

Watch for signs of frostbite:

  • Signs of frostbite include loss of feeling and white or pale appearance in extremities such as fingers, toes, ear lobes, and the tip of the nose. If symptoms are detected, get medical help immediately.

Watch for signs of hypothermia:

  • These include uncontrollable shivering, memory loss, disorientation, incoherence, slurred speech, drowsiness and apparent exhaustion. If you or someone you know shows any of these symptoms, contact a healthcare provider immediately. If symptoms are severe, call 911.

Heating guidelines for property owners and tenants:

  • In accordance with the Massachusetts State Sanitary Code, the heating season officially begins on September 15 and runs through June 15. Property owners must heat habitable spaces at a minimum temperature of 68 degrees between 7 a.m. and 11:00 p.m. and 64 degrees between 11:01 p.m. and 6:59 a.m.

  • In case of emergency, property owners are encouraged to keep a list of licensed contractors (electrician, plumber and general contractor) on file. Tenants experiencing problems with their heating system should check the thermostat, ensure the dial is turned on, and report insufficient or no heat problems to the property owner or manager immediately.

  • If your landlord or property manager is unresponsive, call 311 to file a complaint.

Heating safety:

  • Never try to heat your home using a charcoal or gas grill, a kitchen stove, or other product not specifically designed as a heater. These can cause a fire or produce dangerous levels of carbon monoxide very quickly. 

  • Have your heating system cleaned and checked annually.

  • Install and maintain smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors on every level of your home. Carbon monoxide is an invisible gas produced whenever any fuel is burned. Common sources include oil or gas furnaces, water heaters, fireplaces, stoves, and some space heaters. It has no smell, taste, or color. It is poisonous and can be deadly.

Tips to keep water flowing and pipes unfrozen during extreme cold:

  • The Boston Water and Sewer Commission recommends homeowners locate a home's main water shut off valve, and learn how to use it. Should a frozen pipe burst, shutting the main valve quickly will minimize flooding and property damage.

  • Homeowners should insulate pipes in unheated areas like basements, garages and crawl spaces. Use inexpensive hardware store materials to prevent pipes from freezing and to keep warm water flowing.

  • Circulate warm air around pipes by keeping cabinet doors open. Circulate a trickle of tap water through pipes during extreme cold to help prevent them freezing up.

  • Locate your water meter, protect it from drafts, and make sure basement doors and windows are shut tight.

  • If pipes do freeze, slowly thaw them with a hair dryer, if possible. If water is lost in all taps, call BWSC 24-hour Emergency Assistance Line at 617-989-7000.  

Emergency home repair resources: 

  • Income-eligible homeowners and Boston's residents over age 60 can receive assistance with winter emergencies and repairs, such as fixing storm damage, leaking roofs, furnaces and leaking/frozen pipes. For assistance, residents should call the Mayor's hotline at 311 or the Boston Home Center at 617-635-HOME (4663).   

  • In addition, the Mayor's Seniors Save program helps income eligible Bostonians over the age of 60 replace old, inefficient heating systems with a new brand new heating system, even before a failure occurs during the cold winter months. Older adults can also call 311 or the Boston Home Center at 617-635-HOME (4663) to be connected with a City staffer to provide additional details.   

For emergency alerts, including cold-weather alerts, residents are encouraged to sign up for Alert Boston. For more information, please visit the Winter in Boston guide and follow @CityofBoston on Twitter.

###


Jan 26
Mayor Walsh Announces Updates on Boston’s Reopening Plan

Tuesday, January 26, 2021 - As Boston's COVID-19 numbers trend modestly downward and Massachusetts continues to expand access to vaccination against COVID-19, Mayor Martin J. Walsh today announced the City of Boston will return to Step One of Phase Three of the Reopening Massachusetts plan on February 1, 2021. 

"I want to thank everyone who continues to do their part to protect our city," said Mayor Walsh. "While there has been some improvement in recent weeks, it's still vital that everyone remains vigilant. Wear your masks. Avoid gatherings. Wash your hands and disinfect surfaces. Think about the simple steps you can take on a daily basis to protect yourself and your loved ones."

As of January 17, 2021, the City was averaging 415.6 COVID-19 positive cases per day, down from a high of 590.4 in mid-January, and the City's positivity rate was at 7.2 percent, down from a high of 8.9 percent in early January. For more information on COVID-19 cases per neighborhood, visit here

Given the improvement in the number of COVID-19 cases and the City's positivity rate, the City of Boston will return to Step One of Phase Three of the  Reopening Massachusetts plan on February 1, 2021. Boston had been in Step One of Phase Three of the Reopening Massachusetts plan since July 6, before returning to a modified Step Two of Phase Two on December 16, 2020. This was done to help reduce the spread of the virus during and after the holiday period when more people were traveling or gathering with others from outside of their household. 

Massachusetts recently announced an extension of the existing 25 percent capacity limits for most businesses through Monday, February 8, 2021. All gatherings and events remain subject to current capacity limits of 10 people indoors and 25 people outdoors. The gatherings limit applies to private homes, event venues and public spaces. For a list of sectors subject to the extended capacity restrictions, click here.

The following industries in the City of Boston may reopen on February 1, 2021, at 25 percent capacity: 

  • Indoor fitness centers and health clubs, including gyms using alternative spaces 

  • Movie theaters

  • Museums

  • Aquariums

  • Indoor recreational and athletic facilities 

  • Indoor recreational venues with potential for low-contact (batting cages, driving ranges, bowling alleys, rock-climbing) 

  • Sightseeing and other organized tours (bus tours, duck tours, harbor cruises, whale watching)

  • Indoor historical spaces & sites 

  • Indoor event spaces such as meeting rooms, ballrooms, private party rooms, and social clubs (limited to 10 people)

  • Indoor and outdoor gaming arcades associated with gaming devices

Additional details about the current state of reopening can be found on Boston.gov/reopening

 

COVID-19 Vaccination and Testing Efforts

The City is working with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to vaccinate residents against COVID-19. The Reggie Lewis Center will open as a vaccination site during the first week of February to anyone who is eligible under the State's vaccine distribution timeline. In Boston, two mass vaccination sites have been announced: Fenway Park and Reggie Lewis Center. Following the State's lead, the Boston Public Health Commission in partnership with the Mayor's Office of Health and Human Services is working to create equitable access to the COVID-19 vaccine across all populations and neighborhoods in the city.

"In these unprecedented times, we must work together and find new ways to support each other and our community," says Roxbury Community College president Dr. Valerie Roberson. "It's crucial to have a mass vaccination center that is accessible via public transportation in a location that is familiar and comfortable. We are pleased to have the opportunity to provide such tangible support to the City and State efforts to combat the spread of COVID-19."

For more information on when and where you will be eligible to receive the vaccine, please visit  Mass.gov/COVIDvaccine. 

"Getting tested regularly and taking the vaccine when you have the opportunity to are key to helping us defeat this virus," said Mayor Walsh. "We have over 30 testing sites open across the city that are quick and easy to utilize. We know people have lots of questions about the vaccine, and we're committed to making this information as clear and accessible as possible. I want to thank Roxbury Community College for working with us and the Commonwealth to open a mass vaccination site at the Reggie Lewis Center. We'll continue to work collaboratively to direct resources to where they're needed most."

Together with the Office of Arts and Culture, the Office of Health & Human Services, and the Boston Public Health Commission, Mayor Walsh today announced the Strand Theatre is now serving as a COVID-19 testing site. The testing is being conducted thanks to a partnership between the City of Boston, The Strand Theater, the Brookside Community Health Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Southern Jamaica Plain Health Center, and Upham's Corner Community Health Center. Testing at the Strand is available to anyone at no cost and regardless of symptoms. Insurance is also not required.

The Strand, which is located at 543 Columbia Road in the Upham's Corner neighborhood of Dorchester, is open for testing on Mondays and Wednesdays from 8:30 a.m. - until 4:00 p.m. There is no prior registration required, and testing is walk-up only. Individuals arriving for testing should enter through the main entrance of the building and will wait in line inside the theater. Testing will occur outside at a mobile van in the back parking lot of the Strand. There will be no public parking available at the Strand during testing. 

The City of Boston is partnering with community health centers to increase access to testing, particularly in neighborhoods experiencing higher rates of COVID-19. More information about COVID-19 testing sites throughout the city can be found here. The City is also offering mobile testing sites that are available to anyone, regardless of symptoms and insurance coverage.

For more information about Boston's reopening, please visit boston.gov/reopening. For additional questions, please visit the City's coronavirus website or call 3-1-1, Boston's 24-hour constituent hotline. Text BOSCOVID to 888-777 to receive text alerts on a regular basis, available in 11 languages.

###

Jan 17
BPHC Statement on First Case of COVID-19 Variant Confirmed in Massachusetts

Sunday, January 17, 2021- The first case of the COVID variant B.1.1.7. has been found in a Boston resident who traveled internationally. This individual, a woman in her 20s, returned to Boston on January 3, 2021 and had a brief (approximately 2 hour) layover at Logan International Airport before traveling to another state.  This individual remains in that state and is currently asymptomatic. The Boston Public Health Commission's Infectious Disease Bureau is working closely with our partners at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health on a thorough case investigation. The health and well-being of all Boston residents remains our top priority. We will monitor this situation closely and we continue to closely watch the City's COVID-19 metrics.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there is no evidence that this variant causes more severe illness or increased risk of death. However, we know this variant of the virus spreads more easily and quickly than other variants. A higher transmission rate will lead to more cases and could potentially lead to a burden our health care system. That is why it is critical we all stay vigilant and do everything we can to stop the spread of this virus. We need everyone to continue to stay home as much as possible, always wear a face mask when outside your home, keep at least 6 feet of distance between yourself and others, wash your hands often and continue to get tested. 

###


Media Contact: 

Caitlin McLaughlin 

cmclaughlin@bphc.org 

(857-393-0002)


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Boston Public Health Commission
1010 Massachusetts Ave, 6th Floor, Boston, MA 02118.
Phone:(617) 534-5395 Email: info@bphc.org